Hours of Operation:
  • Available 7 Days a Week.
  • Emergency service available
Contact Information:
  • Phone:  713 817-1769    
  • Fax: 713 353-6797    
  • Email:  Contact Us

'Quality And Affordability Meet'

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About Us

 Specializing in Attic Insulation, Radiant Barrier, Blown In Attic Insulation, Roofing and Roof Repair, Siding, Hardiplank Siding, Replacement  Windows, Replacement Doors, Remodeling, Wood Floors, Tile Floors, Laminate Flooring, Concrete Finishing/Staining, Cabinets, Kitchen Remodels, Bathroom Remodels, Interior/exterior Painting, Pressure Washing Drywall, Water and Storm Damage Repair.

All Attic Insulation is a full service general contractor serving The Woodlands and surrounding areas. We provide our customers prompt, reliable service coupled with the highest professionalism in all phases of their projects. We extend a courteous, honest approach to every customer. Our number one goal is to deliver a high quality service that will make our customers happy. Let us earn your business. Licensed and Insured.   

Call today for a free estimates at 713-817-1769

'QUALITY AND AFFORDABILITY MEET'

Start Saving up to 30% on your energy bills, call us!  

Attic Insulation - R value Attic Insulation, Solar Vents, Rigid Insulation, Cellulose Insulation, Pipeline Insulation, R Insulation, Batt Insulation, Foam Insulation, Blown In Insulation.
 

Radiant Barrier - is a high performance product which comes in a foil insulation or spray insulation. 
 

Radiant Barrier Foil - We can install the Radiant Barrier by stapling this foil to the bottom rafters. You are blocking the heat/cold and it is reversed and being sent back to the roof.
 

Radiant Barrier Spray - Spray is also an effective process and offers extra protection. This product will stop moisture transfer and save you considerable costs. The process includes spraying reflective paint to the underside of the roof decking. 
 

Insulation Removal - Due to problems in attics including leaks, rodents, droppings, and moisture can cause damage to your insulation over time. Mold and mildew can develop and cause additional problems.  This is a dangerous situation for you and your family to handle due to the contamination issues and you should have an expert for your insulation removal.
 

Roofing - All types of Roof Replacements and Roofing Repair.  Composite Shingle Roofs,  Tile Roofs, Shake Shingle Roofs, Metal Roofs, and more. Visit our website to check out our roofing section.

Siding - Siding Replacement and Siding Repair, Hardiplank Siding.

Floors - Wood Flooring, Laminate Floors, Tile Floor, and Concrete Flooring Finishing/Staining.

 Cabinets - Remove old Cabinets; measure and install new Cabinets. Custom cabinets or pre fab cabinets.

 Interior/Exterior Painting - Interior Painting and Exterior Painting, all types of Painting

Replacement Windows - New Windows and Replacement Windows, Energy Efficient Windows.

 Replacement Doors – Interior Doors, Exterior Doors, New Doors and Replacement Doors.

 Remodeling –All type of remodeling jobs. Hardiplank Siding, Drywall Repair, Kitchen Remodels, Bathroom Remodels, Doors and Replacement Doors ,Windows and Replacement Windows, Water and Storm Damage Repairs and much more, roofing and roof repairs, interior and exterior painting, cabinet replacement, pressure washing, Insulation.

Pressure Washing - Commercial Pressure Washing and Residential Pressure Washing. 

  FREE ESTIMATES      CALL TODAY!   713-817-1769 

 Experience insurance company negotiators, making the process hassle free for you. Licensed  & Insured.   

Different types of Attic Insulation

R value Insulation -The use of the term R value Insulation is based on the strength of the material.  When you have a high R value the strength is at the highest level vs. a low R value at a lower level.

Solar Vents - To eliminate mold and mildew solar vents can eliminate these problems in Houston homes and businesses.  They are very quiet and a reliable source of ventilation.

Rigid Attic Insulation - Rigid attic insulation is commonly used to help the energy maximization for a home or office building.  This process keeps a room cold or hot air from the walls.

Cellulose Attic Insulation - Cellulose attic insulation has been around for many years and has grown popular as a product that is primarily used between interior and exterior walls for homes and buildings.  This protect is also resistant to fire.

Batt Attic Insulation - Many consumers choose Batt attic Insulation which is used to insulate below floors, above ceilings and within walls.  The Batt Insulation process is the most economical process to use and has a high performance level.

Sound Control - In many cities homes are being built closer to each other and sound can reflect into your home.  Noise can travel very easily through doors, walls and ceilings.  Therefore, home or business insulation is effective in reducing the outside and inside of noise.   We offer different types of sound insulation and will discuss the different programs during your consultation.

Foam Attic Insulation - Foam attic insulation is sprayed on the walls of homes and business and in tight crevices.   The majority of foam insulation can be seen in attic or any part of a building/home where there are unfinished walls.

Spray Foam Insulation - In many homes and businesses there are hard to reach spaces that only Spray Foam Insulation can reach.  By using this processed you can eliminate hot and cold air, outside pests including rodents and when flooding occurs this can help be an effective method.  Spray foam creates an airtight seal, therefore water and water cannot come in or out.
 

Radiant Barrier - Has become a very popular product in the attic insulation industry due to the success of ref heat. In the southern states like, Houston, Texas, Radiant Barrier  is used in conjunction with regular insulation to provide an additional protection to reduce heat in the summer and cold in the winter months.  Radiant Barrier  is also popular due to the history of lowering energy costs. 
 

Different types of Roofing Shingles
 

Composite roof shingles are made of a mixture of several commonly used roofing materials, which together allow for some very desirable performance features. This is credited as the reason why composite shingles are one of the most popular sheathing materials available today, constituting a large selection of America’s roofs. Composite roof shingles can be based on a number of materials, including slate, shake, laminate, wood, and slate. Composite shingles are manufactured in almost any color, shape, or size, and do not cost significantly more than other types of roof shingles.
 

 

Wood Roof Shingles and Shakes

Wood shingles that are rough and rustic are called shakes. They come in varying sizes and lengths of 16, 18 and 24 inches. Nailing wood shingles is done in a way that enables air circulation, while shakes are laid so that they form a tight surface. Both methods are devised to assure durability and resist decay.
 

 

Metal Roof Shingles

Widely versatile and remarkably durable, metal roof shingles are used for residential purposes in a way that is both appealing and functional. Metal roof shingles resemble different styles and roof profiles, from Spanish and mission tile, to slate roofs and Victorian metal tiles. The metal roof shingles are highly functional, protecting the home from strong winds and rains in the winter, and reflecting the sun and heat in the summer, as well as for other weather conditions. For long lasting roofs, with a lifetime twice as long as asphalt roof tiles, metal roof tiles are the way to go. It is also an efficient, energy conserving roofing material as it reflects much of the sun and heat back to the air, saving energy in warm climate regions especially

 

Ceramic Tile Roof

The list of advantages is long and rich. Ceramic roof tiles are a natural and durable roofing product. It adds aesthetically to a home and gives it a natural look. This natural look may look historical and contemporary at the same time.

 

Different types of Siding Material
 

Fiber Cement

Siding materials are made from compacted layers of fiber and cement.  This product is very popular.  It is flame retardant due to it being made from concrete. Some fiber cement products are pre-painted but most are just pre-primed and require painting.  Fiber cement siding materials comes in (lap), vertical T-111, shingle/shake siding & soffits material types.

Cedar siding

Materials are made from cedar trees and are typically more cost prohibited than vinyl or cedar siding. Redwood is very similar to cedar but looks a little different. Cedar siding is usually pre-stained or pre-primed at the supplier but not always.  Cedar shake siding materials are often left ‘raw’ and naturally weather and turn a ‘silver’ color, you typically only see this look at the beach since salt is hard on painted surfaces.
 

Composite siding

Materials include manufactured wood products.  Typically this category is made from wood chips, wood discs, wood wafers or sawdust.  Many class action lawsuits have occurred with composite siding materials.  Our advice is to steer clear of these products for exterior siding application without extensive research on your part.

Different types of Flooring

Hardwood and engineered wood flooring

Wood flooring looks great and is durable with proper care. Although they are susceptible to scratches, dents and moisture, hardwood floors can be refinished multiple times, often lasting the lifetime of a home.

Laminate Flooring

Plastic laminate flooring doesn't look as nice as a hardwood or stone, but it can mimic the look for much less. Laminate floors are durable -- resistant to scratches, stains, UV light and dents. However, they are… susceptible to moisture damage, so they aren't the best choice for kitchens or bathrooms.

Stone flooring

Can be beautiful, durable and add to the value of your home. Installation is a job for professionals, however, adding to the already high initial cost. Stone floors also require periodic sealing to protect them from staining and moisture. Stone floors work well in kitchens and bathrooms because they are moisture resistant, but they can be slippery and quite cold unless there is underfloor heating. Marble and granite are two of the most classic stone flooring options, while slate offers a warmer, more rustic appearance.

Tile Flooring

Often considered as elegant as stone, but it's less expensive. Tile is stylish and relatively durable, but it is also hard and… noisy and can be prone to chipping and other signs of wear. Glazed tiles ? available in most popular types ? offer the best durability and easiest maintenance. Ceramic tiles are the most popular, though other types are available.
 

Use full terms as it relates to insulation
 

Baffles: Device to maintain a ventilation space between the insulation and roof deck, assuring air flow from the eave/soffit vents to ridge vent or other roof vents provided in attics and cathedral ceilings (Owens Corning product is Raft-R-Mate).
 

Cavity: The empty space between studs or joists typically filled with insulation.
 

Eave Vents: Vent openings located in the soffit under the eaves of a house to allow the passage of air through the attic and out the roof vents.
 

Economic Thickness (of insulation): That thickness which provides the lowest possible annual cost of energy, insulation and energy producing equipment.
 

Faced Insulation: Insulation with a facing already attached. Kraft paper or foil-backed paper are common facings.
 

Fiber Glass Insulation: An energy-efficient glass fiber product manufactured by Owens Corning to ensure the best thermal and noise control performance available.
 

Flat Ceiling: A ceiling with no change in elevation.
 

Foil-Faced Vapor Retarder: Created by coating a foil-backed paper with a thin layer of adhesive, then attaching it to the fiber glass.
 

Gable Vents: A louver vent mounted in the top of the gable to allow the passage of air through the attic.
 

Heat Flow: The rate at which heat moves from an area of higher temperature to an area of lower temperature. Btu/hr (W/hr). Heat flow is generally used to quantify the rate of total heat gain or heat loss of a system.
 

Gable Vents: A louver vent mounted in the top of the gable to allow the passage of air through the attic.
 

Heat Flow: The rate at which heat moves from an area of higher temperature to an area of lower temperature. Btu/hr (W/hr). Heat flow is generally used to quantify the rate of total heat gain or heat loss of a system.
 

I.C. or Insulated Ceiling: Marking on recessed lighting fixtures indicating that they are designed for direct insulation contact.

Insulation Density: Denser insulation products have more fibers per square inch and, therefore, give you greater insulating power through higher R-values.
 

Insulation Supports: 16" or 24" wire rods, nylon banding, or crisscrossed wire to hold floor insulation in place.

Kraft-Faced Vapor Retarder: Created by coating kraft paper with a thin layer of asphalt adhesive. The coated side of the kraft paper is then applied to the unfaced insulation material. The asphalt adhesive bonds the kraft paper and the insulation together.
 

Metal Flue: A metal channel through which hot air, gas, steam or smoke may pass.

Noncombustible: The material will not burn. The glass fibers in PINK FIBERGLAS® Insulation have a natural fire resistance, and are considered non-combustible when tested in accordance to ASTM E136.
 

Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC): A single number rating, the arithmetic average of the individual sound absorption coefficients of a material at 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz to the nearest .05.
 

Polyethylene Vapor Barrier: Plastic film used to prevent moisture from passing through unfaced insulation. Both 4- and 6-mil polyethylene are preferred because they are less likely to be damaged during construction.
 

Rafters: A slope framing member that supports a pitched roof.
 

Relative Humidity: A measure of the amount of moisture in the air with respect to the temperature. It is the ratio of the moisture present to the maximum amount of moisture the air can hold at that temperature.
 

Ridge Vents: A vent mounted along the entire ridge line of the roof to allow the passage of air through the attic or cathedral ceiling.
 

Roof Vents: A louver or small dome mounted near the ridge of the roof to allow the passage of air through the attic.

R-Value: Measure of resistance to heat flow. Insulation materials have tiny pockets of trapped air. These pockets resist the transfer of heat through material. The ability of insulation to slow the transfer of heat is measured in R-values. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation material's ability to resist the flow of heat through it.

 

Sound Absorption Coefficient: The percentage of sound energy incident on the surface of a material that is absorbed by the material. SSL: Self-sealing lap, a feature of pipe insulation covering in which an adhesive strip provides mechanical and vapor retarder closure of the longitudinal seam. See also SSL II.

SSL II: Pipe insulation jacket closure with a double adhesive, self-sealing lap to close the longitudinal seam. (exclusive with Owens Corning.)

Sound Absorption: The process of dissipating or removing sound energy; the property possessed by materials, objects and structures (such as rooms) of absorbing sound energy; the measure of the magnitude of the absorptive property of a material, object or structure.
 

Stapling Flange: A protruding edge on faced insulation used to staple the insulation to the framing.

Stud: A vertical framing member used in both exterior and interior walls.
 

Subfloor: The structural material that spans across floor joists. It serves as a working platform during construction and provides a base for the finish floor.
 

Top Plate: The horizontal member nailed to the top of the studding of a wall.

Unfaced Insulation: Insulation with no attached facing.

Vapor Retarder: Helps control the amount of moisture passing through the insulation and collecting inside exterior walls, ceilings and floors.

Ventilation: Creates a positive flow of air that allows the house to "breathe" and helps prevent moisture build-up year-round.

Wall Plates: In wood-frame construction, the wall is composed of both vertical and horizontal wood members. The vertical members are usually called studs, while the horizontal members are usually called plates. A bottom plate is at the bottom of the wall frame assembly, while two plates are usually used at the top (double top plate).

 

Use full terms as it relaters to Roofing
 

Asphalt:  A bituminous waterproofing agent applied to roofing materials during manufacturing.
 

Asphalt plastic roofing cement:   An asphalt-based cement used to bond roofing materials. Also known as flashing cement or mastic.

Blisters:  Bubbles that may appear on the surface of asphalt roofing after installation.

Build Up Roof:  A flat or low-sloped roof consisting of multiple layers of asphalt and ply sheets.

Bundle:  A package of shingles. There are 3, 4 or 5 bundles per square.

Butt edge:  The lower edge of the shingle tabs.

Caulk:  To fill a joint with mastic or asphalt cement to prevent leaks.

Chalk line:  A line made on the roof by snapping a taut string or cord dusted with chalk. Used for alignment purposes.

Coating:  A layer of viscous asphalt applied to the base material into which granules or other surfacing is embedded.

Collar:  Pre-formed flange placed over a vent pipe to seal the roof around the vent pipe opening. Also called a vent sleeve.

Condensation:  The change of water from vapor to liquid when warm, moisture-laden air comes in contact with a cold surface.

Counter Flashing:  That portion of the flashing attached to a vertical surface to prevent water from migrating behind the base flashing.

Course:  A row of shingles or roll roofing running the length of the roof.

Coverage:  Amount of weather protection provided by the roofing material. Depends on  number of layers of materialbetween the exposed surface of the roofing and the deck; i.e., single coverage, double coverage, etc.

Cricket:  A peaked saddle construction at the back of a chimney to prevent accumulation of snow and ice and to deflect water around the chimney.

Cutout:  The open portions of a strip shingle between the tabs.

Deck:  The surface installed over the supporting framing members to which the roofing is applied.

Downspout:  A pipe for draining water from roof gutters. Also called a leader.

Drip edge:  A non-corrosive, non-staining material used along the eaves and rakes to allow water run-off to drip clear of underlying construction.

Eaves:  The horizontal, lower edge of a sloped roof.

Eaves flashing:  Additional layer of roofing material applied at the eaves to help prevent damage from water back-up.

Edging strips:  Boards nailed along eaves and rakes after cutting back existing wood shingles to provide secure edges for re-roofing with asphalt shingles.

Fiber glass mat:  An asphalt roofing base material manufactured from glass fibers.

Flashing:  Pieces of metal or roll roofing used to prevent seepage of water into a building around any intersection or projection in a roof such as vent pipes, chimneys, adjoining walls, dormers and valleys. Galvanized metal flashing should be minimum 26-gauge.

Gable:  The upper portion of a sidewall that comes to a triangular point at the ridge of a sloping roof.

Gable roof:  A type of roof containing sloping planes of the same pitch on each side of the ridge. Contains a gable at each end.

Gambrel roof:  A type of roof containing two sloping planes of different pitch on each side of the ridge. The lower plane has a steeper slope than the upper. Contains a gable at each end.

Gutter:  The trough that channels water from the eaves to the downspouts.

Hip:  The inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes. Runs from the ridge to the eaves.

Hip roof:  A type of roof containing sloping planes of the same pitch on each of four sides. Contains no gables.

Hip shingles:  Shingles used to cover the inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.

Laminated Shingles:  Strip shingles containing more than one layer of tabs to create extra thickness. Also called three-dimensional shingles.

Lap:  To cover the surface of one shingle or roll with another.

Low Slope Application:  Method of installing asphalt shingles on roof slopes between two and four inches per foot.

Overhang:  That portion of the roof structure that extends beyond the exterior walls of a building.

Pitch:  The degree of roof incline expressed as the ratio of the rise, in feet, to the span, in feet.

Plastic Cement:  A compound used to seal flashings and in some cases to seal down shingles as well as for other small waterproofing jobs. Where plastic cement is required for sealing down shingles, use a dab about the size of a quarter unless otherwise specified.

Ply:  The number of layers of roofing: i.e. one-ply, two-ply.

Rafter:  The supporting framing member immediately beneath the deck, sloping from the ridge to the wall plate.

Rake:  The inclined edge of a sloped roof over a wall from the eave to the ridge.

Random Tab Shingles:  Shingles on which tabs vary in size and exposure.

Release Tape:  A plastic or paper strip that is applied to the back of self-sealing shingles. This strip prevents the shinglesfrom sticking together in the bundles, and need not be removed for application.

Ridge:  The uppermost, horizontal external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.

Rise:  The vertical distance from the eaves line to the ridge.

Roll Roofing:  Asphalt roofing products manufactured in roll form.

Run: The horizontal distance from the eaves to a point directly under the ridge. One half the span.

Shed Roof:  A roof containing only one sloping plane. Has no hips, ridges, valleys or gables.

Single Coverage:  Asphalt roofing that provides one layer of roofing material over the deck.

Slope:  The degree of roof incline expressed as the ratio of the rise, in inches, to the run, in feet.

Soffit:  The finished underside of the eaves.

Square:   A unit of roof measure covering 100 square feet.

Starter:  Asphalt roofing applied at the eaves that provides protection by filling in the spaces under the cutouts and joints of the first course of shingles.

Tab:  The exposed portion of strip shingles defined by cutouts.

Three Tab Shingle:  The most popular type of asphalt shingle usually 12" x 36" in size with three tabs.

Top lap:  That portion of the roofing covered by the succeeding course after installation.

Underlayment:  A layer of asphalt saturated (sometimes referred to as tar paper) which is laid down on a bare deck before

shingles are installed to provide additional protection for the deck.

Valley:  The internal angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes to provide water runoff.

Vent:  Any outlet for air that protrudes through the roof deck such as a pipe or stack. Any device installed on the roof, gable or soffit for the purpose of ventilating the underside of the roof deck.

 

 
 Specializing in Attic Insulation, Radiant Barrier, Blown In Attic Insulation, Roofing and Roof Repair, Siding, Hardiplank Siding, Replacement  Windows, Replacement Doors, Remodeling, Wood Floors, Tile Floors, Laminate Flooring, Concrete Finishing/Staining, Cabinets, Kitchen Remodels, Bathroom Remodels, Interior/exterior Painting, Pressure Washing Drywall, Water and Storm Damage Repair.

All Attic Insulation is a full service general contractor serving The Woodlands and surrounding areas. We provide our customers prompt, reliable service coupled with the highest professionalism in all phases of their projects. We extend a courteous, honest approach to every customer. Our number one goal is to deliver a high quality service that will make our customers happy. Let us earn your business. Licensed and Insured.   

Call today for a free estimates at 713-817-1769

'QUALITY AND AFFORDABILITY MEET'

Start Saving up to 30% on your energy bills, call us!  

Attic Insulation - R value Attic Insulation, Solar Vents, Rigid Insulation, Cellulose Insulation, Pipeline Insulation, R Insulation, Batt Insulation, Foam Insulation, Blown In Insulation.
 

Radiant Barrier - is a high performance product which comes in a foil insulation or spray insulation. 
 

Radiant Barrier Foil - We can install the Radiant Barrier by stapling this foil to the bottom rafters. You are blocking the heat/cold and it is reversed and being sent back to the roof.
 

Radiant Barrier Spray - Spray is also an effective process and offers extra protection. This product will stop moisture transfer and save you considerable costs. The process includes spraying reflective paint to the underside of the roof decking. 
 

Insulation Removal - Due to problems in attics including leaks, rodents, droppings, and moisture can cause damage to your insulation over time. Mold and mildew can develop and cause additional problems.  This is a dangerous situation for you and your family to handle due to the contamination issues and you should have an expert for your insulation removal.
 

Roofing - All types of Roof Replacements and Roofing Repair.  Composite Shingle Roofs,  Tile Roofs, Shake Shingle Roofs, Metal Roofs, and more. Visit our website to check out our roofing section.

Siding - Siding Replacement and Siding Repair, Hardiplank Siding.

Floors - Wood Flooring, Laminate Floors, Tile Floor, and Concrete Flooring Finishing/Staining.

 Cabinets - Remove old Cabinets; measure and install new Cabinets. Custom cabinets or pre fab cabinets.

 Interior/Exterior Painting - Interior Painting and Exterior Painting, all types of Painting

Replacement Windows - New Windows and Replacement Windows, Energy Efficient Windows.

 Replacement Doors – Interior Doors, Exterior Doors, New Doors and Replacement Doors.

 Remodeling –All type of remodeling jobs. Hardiplank Siding, Drywall Repair, Kitchen Remodels, Bathroom Remodels, Doors and Replacement Doors ,Windows and Replacement Windows, Water and Storm Damage Repairs and much more, roofing and roof repairs, interior and exterior painting, cabinet replacement, pressure washing, Insulation.

Pressure Washing - Commercial Pressure Washing and Residential Pressure Washing. 

  FREE ESTIMATES      CALL TODAY!   713-817-1769 

 Experience insurance company negotiators, making the process hassle free for you. Licensed  & Insured.   

Different types of Attic Insulation

R value Insulation -The use of the term R value Insulation is based on the strength of the material.  When you have a high R value the strength is at the highest level vs. a low R value at a lower level.

Solar Vents - To eliminate mold and mildew solar vents can eliminate these problems in Houston homes and businesses.  They are very quiet and a reliable source of ventilation.

Rigid Attic Insulation - Rigid attic insulation is commonly used to help the energy maximization for a home or office building.  This process keeps a room cold or hot air from the walls.

Cellulose Attic Insulation - Cellulose attic insulation has been around for many years and has grown popular as a product that is primarily used between interior and exterior walls for homes and buildings.  This protect is also resistant to fire.

Batt Attic Insulation - Many consumers choose Batt attic Insulation which is used to insulate below floors, above ceilings and within walls.  The Batt Insulation process is the most economical process to use and has a high performance level.

Sound Control - In many cities homes are being built closer to each other and sound can reflect into your home.  Noise can travel very easily through doors, walls and ceilings.  Therefore, home or business insulation is effective in reducing the outside and inside of noise.   We offer different types of sound insulation and will discuss the different programs during your consultation.

Foam Attic Insulation - Foam attic insulation is sprayed on the walls of homes and business and in tight crevices.   The majority of foam insulation can be seen in attic or any part of a building/home where there are unfinished walls.

Spray Foam Insulation - In many homes and businesses there are hard to reach spaces that only Spray Foam Insulation can reach.  By using this processed you can eliminate hot and cold air, outside pests including rodents and when flooding occurs this can help be an effective method.  Spray foam creates an airtight seal, therefore water and water cannot come in or out.
 

Radiant Barrier - Has become a very popular product in the attic insulation industry due to the success of ref heat. In the southern states like, Houston, Texas, Radiant Barrier  is used in conjunction with regular insulation to provide an additional protection to reduce heat in the summer and cold in the winter months.  Radiant Barrier  is also popular due to the history of lowering energy costs. 
 

Different types of Roofing Shingles
 

Composite roof shingles are made of a mixture of several commonly used roofing materials, which together allow for some very desirable performance features. This is credited as the reason why composite shingles are one of the most popular sheathing materials available today, constituting a large selection of America’s roofs. Composite roof shingles can be based on a number of materials, including slate, shake, laminate, wood, and slate. Composite shingles are manufactured in almost any color, shape, or size, and do not cost significantly more than other types of roof shingles.
 

 

Wood Roof Shingles and Shakes

Wood shingles that are rough and rustic are called shakes. They come in varying sizes and lengths of 16, 18 and 24 inches. Nailing wood shingles is done in a way that enables air circulation, while shakes are laid so that they form a tight surface. Both methods are devised to assure durability and resist decay.
 

 

Metal Roof Shingles

Widely versatile and remarkably durable, metal roof shingles are used for residential purposes in a way that is both appealing and functional. Metal roof shingles resemble different styles and roof profiles, from Spanish and mission tile, to slate roofs and Victorian metal tiles. The metal roof shingles are highly functional, protecting the home from strong winds and rains in the winter, and reflecting the sun and heat in the summer, as well as for other weather conditions. For long lasting roofs, with a lifetime twice as long as asphalt roof tiles, metal roof tiles are the way to go. It is also an efficient, energy conserving roofing material as it reflects much of the sun and heat back to the air, saving energy in warm climate regions especially

 

Ceramic Tile Roof

The list of advantages is long and rich. Ceramic roof tiles are a natural and durable roofing product. It adds aesthetically to a home and gives it a natural look. This natural look may look historical and contemporary at the same time.

 

Different types of Siding Material
 

Fiber Cement

Siding materials are made from compacted layers of fiber and cement.  This product is very popular.  It is flame retardant due to it being made from concrete. Some fiber cement products are pre-painted but most are just pre-primed and require painting.  Fiber cement siding materials comes in (lap), vertical T-111, shingle/shake siding & soffits material types.

Cedar siding

Materials are made from cedar trees and are typically more cost prohibited than vinyl or cedar siding. Redwood is very similar to cedar but looks a little different. Cedar siding is usually pre-stained or pre-primed at the supplier but not always.  Cedar shake siding materials are often left ‘raw’ and naturally weather and turn a ‘silver’ color, you typically only see this look at the beach since salt is hard on painted surfaces.
 

Composite siding

Materials include manufactured wood products.  Typically this category is made from wood chips, wood discs, wood wafers or sawdust.  Many class action lawsuits have occurred with composite siding materials.  Our advice is to steer clear of these products for exterior siding application without extensive research on your part.

Different types of Flooring

Hardwood and engineered wood flooring

Wood flooring looks great and is durable with proper care. Although they are susceptible to scratches, dents and moisture, hardwood floors can be refinished multiple times, often lasting the lifetime of a home.

Laminate Flooring

Plastic laminate flooring doesn't look as nice as a hardwood or stone, but it can mimic the look for much less. Laminate floors are durable -- resistant to scratches, stains, UV light and dents. However, they are… susceptible to moisture damage, so they aren't the best choice for kitchens or bathrooms.

Stone flooring

Can be beautiful, durable and add to the value of your home. Installation is a job for professionals, however, adding to the already high initial cost. Stone floors also require periodic sealing to protect them from staining and moisture. Stone floors work well in kitchens and bathrooms because they are moisture resistant, but they can be slippery and quite cold unless there is underfloor heating. Marble and granite are two of the most classic stone flooring options, while slate offers a warmer, more rustic appearance.

Tile Flooring

Often considered as elegant as stone, but it's less expensive. Tile is stylish and relatively durable, but it is also hard and… noisy and can be prone to chipping and other signs of wear. Glazed tiles ? available in most popular types ? offer the best durability and easiest maintenance. Ceramic tiles are the most popular, though other types are available.
 

Use full terms as it relates to insulation
 

Baffles: Device to maintain a ventilation space between the insulation and roof deck, assuring air flow from the eave/soffit vents to ridge vent or other roof vents provided in attics and cathedral ceilings (Owens Corning product is Raft-R-Mate).
 

Cavity: The empty space between studs or joists typically filled with insulation.
 

Eave Vents: Vent openings located in the soffit under the eaves of a house to allow the passage of air through the attic and out the roof vents.
 

Economic Thickness (of insulation): That thickness which provides the lowest possible annual cost of energy, insulation and energy producing equipment.
 

Faced Insulation: Insulation with a facing already attached. Kraft paper or foil-backed paper are common facings.
 

Fiber Glass Insulation: An energy-efficient glass fiber product manufactured by Owens Corning to ensure the best thermal and noise control performance available.
 

Flat Ceiling: A ceiling with no change in elevation.
 

Foil-Faced Vapor Retarder: Created by coating a foil-backed paper with a thin layer of adhesive, then attaching it to the fiber glass.
 

Gable Vents: A louver vent mounted in the top of the gable to allow the passage of air through the attic.
 

Heat Flow: The rate at which heat moves from an area of higher temperature to an area of lower temperature. Btu/hr (W/hr). Heat flow is generally used to quantify the rate of total heat gain or heat loss of a system.
 

Gable Vents: A louver vent mounted in the top of the gable to allow the passage of air through the attic.
 

Heat Flow: The rate at which heat moves from an area of higher temperature to an area of lower temperature. Btu/hr (W/hr). Heat flow is generally used to quantify the rate of total heat gain or heat loss of a system.
 

I.C. or Insulated Ceiling: Marking on recessed lighting fixtures indicating that they are designed for direct insulation contact.

Insulation Density: Denser insulation products have more fibers per square inch and, therefore, give you greater insulating power through higher R-values.
 

Insulation Supports: 16" or 24" wire rods, nylon banding, or crisscrossed wire to hold floor insulation in place.

Kraft-Faced Vapor Retarder: Created by coating kraft paper with a thin layer of asphalt adhesive. The coated side of the kraft paper is then applied to the unfaced insulation material. The asphalt adhesive bonds the kraft paper and the insulation together.
 

Metal Flue: A metal channel through which hot air, gas, steam or smoke may pass.

Noncombustible: The material will not burn. The glass fibers in PINK FIBERGLAS® Insulation have a natural fire resistance, and are considered non-combustible when tested in accordance to ASTM E136.
 

Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC): A single number rating, the arithmetic average of the individual sound absorption coefficients of a material at 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz to the nearest .05.
 

Polyethylene Vapor Barrier: Plastic film used to prevent moisture from passing through unfaced insulation. Both 4- and 6-mil polyethylene are preferred because they are less likely to be damaged during construction.
 

Rafters: A slope framing member that supports a pitched roof.
 

Relative Humidity: A measure of the amount of moisture in the air with respect to the temperature. It is the ratio of the moisture present to the maximum amount of moisture the air can hold at that temperature.
 

Ridge Vents: A vent mounted along the entire ridge line of the roof to allow the passage of air through the attic or cathedral ceiling.
 

Roof Vents: A louver or small dome mounted near the ridge of the roof to allow the passage of air through the attic.

R-Value: Measure of resistance to heat flow. Insulation materials have tiny pockets of trapped air. These pockets resist the transfer of heat through material. The ability of insulation to slow the transfer of heat is measured in R-values. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation material's ability to resist the flow of heat through it.

 

Sound Absorption Coefficient: The percentage of sound energy incident on the surface of a material that is absorbed by the material. SSL: Self-sealing lap, a feature of pipe insulation covering in which an adhesive strip provides mechanical and vapor retarder closure of the longitudinal seam. See also SSL II.

SSL II: Pipe insulation jacket closure with a double adhesive, self-sealing lap to close the longitudinal seam. (exclusive with Owens Corning.)

Sound Absorption: The process of dissipating or removing sound energy; the property possessed by materials, objects and structures (such as rooms) of absorbing sound energy; the measure of the magnitude of the absorptive property of a material, object or structure.
 

Stapling Flange: A protruding edge on faced insulation used to staple the insulation to the framing.

Stud: A vertical framing member used in both exterior and interior walls.
 

Subfloor: The structural material that spans across floor joists. It serves as a working platform during construction and provides a base for the finish floor.
 

Top Plate: The horizontal member nailed to the top of the studding of a wall.

Unfaced Insulation: Insulation with no attached facing.

Vapor Retarder: Helps control the amount of moisture passing through the insulation and collecting inside exterior walls, ceilings and floors.

Ventilation: Creates a positive flow of air that allows the house to "breathe" and helps prevent moisture build-up year-round.

Wall Plates: In wood-frame construction, the wall is composed of both vertical and horizontal wood members. The vertical members are usually called studs, while the horizontal members are usually called plates. A bottom plate is at the bottom of the wall frame assembly, while two plates are usually used at the top (double top plate).

 

Use full terms as it relaters to Roofing
 

Asphalt:  A bituminous waterproofing agent applied to roofing materials during manufacturing.
 

Asphalt plastic roofing cement:   An asphalt-based cement used to bond roofing materials. Also known as flashing cement or mastic.

Blisters:  Bubbles that may appear on the surface of asphalt roofing after installation.

Build Up Roof:  A flat or low-sloped roof consisting of multiple layers of asphalt and ply sheets.

Bundle:  A package of shingles. There are 3, 4 or 5 bundles per square.

Butt edge:  The lower edge of the shingle tabs.

Caulk:  To fill a joint with mastic or asphalt cement to prevent leaks.

Chalk line:  A line made on the roof by snapping a taut string or cord dusted with chalk. Used for alignment purposes.

Coating:  A layer of viscous asphalt applied to the base material into which granules or other surfacing is embedded.

Collar:  Pre-formed flange placed over a vent pipe to seal the roof around the vent pipe opening. Also called a vent sleeve.

Condensation:  The change of water from vapor to liquid when warm, moisture-laden air comes in contact with a cold surface.

Counter Flashing:  That portion of the flashing attached to a vertical surface to prevent water from migrating behind the base flashing.

Course:  A row of shingles or roll roofing running the length of the roof.

Coverage:  Amount of weather protection provided by the roofing material. Depends on  number of layers of materialbetween the exposed surface of the roofing and the deck; i.e., single coverage, double coverage, etc.

Cricket:  A peaked saddle construction at the back of a chimney to prevent accumulation of snow and ice and to deflect water around the chimney.

Cutout:  The open portions of a strip shingle between the tabs.

Deck:  The surface installed over the supporting framing members to which the roofing is applied.

Downspout:  A pipe for draining water from roof gutters. Also called a leader.

Drip edge:  A non-corrosive, non-staining material used along the eaves and rakes to allow water run-off to drip clear of underlying construction.

Eaves:  The horizontal, lower edge of a sloped roof.

Eaves flashing:  Additional layer of roofing material applied at the eaves to help prevent damage from water back-up.

Edging strips:  Boards nailed along eaves and rakes after cutting back existing wood shingles to provide secure edges for re-roofing with asphalt shingles.

Fiber glass mat:  An asphalt roofing base material manufactured from glass fibers.

Flashing:  Pieces of metal or roll roofing used to prevent seepage of water into a building around any intersection or projection in a roof such as vent pipes, chimneys, adjoining walls, dormers and valleys. Galvanized metal flashing should be minimum 26-gauge.

Gable:  The upper portion of a sidewall that comes to a triangular point at the ridge of a sloping roof.

Gable roof:  A type of roof containing sloping planes of the same pitch on each side of the ridge. Contains a gable at each end.

Gambrel roof:  A type of roof containing two sloping planes of different pitch on each side of the ridge. The lower plane has a steeper slope than the upper. Contains a gable at each end.

Gutter:  The trough that channels water from the eaves to the downspouts.

Hip:  The inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes. Runs from the ridge to the eaves.

Hip roof:  A type of roof containing sloping planes of the same pitch on each of four sides. Contains no gables.

Hip shingles:  Shingles used to cover the inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.

Laminated Shingles:  Strip shingles containing more than one layer of tabs to create extra thickness. Also called three-dimensional shingles.

Lap:  To cover the surface of one shingle or roll with another.

Low Slope Application:  Method of installing asphalt shingles on roof slopes between two and four inches per foot.

Overhang:  That portion of the roof structure that extends beyond the exterior walls of a building.

Pitch:  The degree of roof incline expressed as the ratio of the rise, in feet, to the span, in feet.

Plastic Cement:  A compound used to seal flashings and in some cases to seal down shingles as well as for other small waterproofing jobs. Where plastic cement is required for sealing down shingles, use a dab about the size of a quarter unless otherwise specified.

Ply:  The number of layers of roofing: i.e. one-ply, two-ply.

Rafter:  The supporting framing member immediately beneath the deck, sloping from the ridge to the wall plate.

Rake:  The inclined edge of a sloped roof over a wall from the eave to the ridge.

Random Tab Shingles:  Shingles on which tabs vary in size and exposure.

Release Tape:  A plastic or paper strip that is applied to the back of self-sealing shingles. This strip prevents the shinglesfrom sticking together in the bundles, and need not be removed for application.

Ridge:  The uppermost, horizontal external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.

Rise:  The vertical distance from the eaves line to the ridge.

Roll Roofing:  Asphalt roofing products manufactured in roll form.

Run: The horizontal distance from the eaves to a point directly under the ridge. One half the span.

Shed Roof:  A roof containing only one sloping plane. Has no hips, ridges, valleys or gables.

Single Coverage:  Asphalt roofing that provides one layer of roofing material over the deck.

Slope:  The degree of roof incline expressed as the ratio of the rise, in inches, to the run, in feet.

Soffit:  The finished underside of the eaves.

Square:   A unit of roof measure covering 100 square feet.

Starter:  Asphalt roofing applied at the eaves that provides protection by filling in the spaces under the cutouts and joints of the first course of shingles.

Tab:  The exposed portion of strip shingles defined by cutouts.

Three Tab Shingle:  The most popular type of asphalt shingle usually 12" x 36" in size with three tabs.

Top lap:  That portion of the roofing covered by the succeeding course after installation.

Underlayment:  A layer of asphalt saturated (sometimes referred to as tar paper) which is laid down on a bare deck before

shingles are installed to provide additional protection for the deck.

Valley:  The internal angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes to provide water runoff.

Vent:  Any outlet for air that protrudes through the roof deck such as a pipe or stack. Any device installed on the roof, gable or soffit for the purpose of ventilating the underside of the roof deck.

 

 
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